VW to pay $5.8 billion to settle US case, execs charged with conspiracy

VW to pay $5.8 billion to settle US case, execs charged with conspiracy

Volkswagen took a major step toward resolving one of the darkest chapters in its history Wednesday, pleading guilty to an emissions-cheating scandal and agreeing to pay $US4.3 billion in criminal and civil charges as the US announced charges against five new individuals.As part of its settlement, VW pleaded guilty to charges of conspiracy, obstruction of justice and using false statements to import cars to the US VW executives Heinz-Jakob Neusser, Jens Hadler and Richard Dorenkamp were among those charged with conspiracy.

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The men who exposed the VW scandal John German and Peter Mock wanted to find out how to replicate Volkswagen’s success in creating clean diesel cars. But the numbers didn’t add up.

The court filings detail a scheme in which the German automaker deceived regulators and customers for years, and dozens of employees destroyed documents, even after the scandal broke in September 2015.The emissions-cheating disclosures undermined the sterling reputation of German engineering and threatened the viability of a company that vies with Toyota as the world’s biggest carmaker. Volkswagen pressed to resolve investigations and lawsuits as quickly as possible, while working to repair its reputation with car buyers and dealers. It’s now selling more cars and trucks then ever, offsetting declines in the US with strong sales in China.
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